Bagley Township Otsego County

Bagley Township

Otsego County

Assessor

Important Info

Contact

Jason Woodcox (MAAO)

Statutory Duties

  • The assessor or the assessor’s assistant(s) must perform the following specific duties annually (if an assistant, the assessor must have direct supervision in all of the following tasks):
    • Appraise and assess taxable property (including new construction and including ensuring the taxable value uncapping of property following transfers of ownership).
    • Prepare and maintain the assessment roll, property classifications, property descriptions, special act rolls and other assessment records and have an established procedure to update records on a regular basis.
    • Attend Board of Review meetings if requested by the Township or City.
    • Attend meetings with the public at the Township or City municipal office facility.
    • Assist legal counsel in the prosecution or defense of cases arising out of assessment administration activities.
    • Appear before the Michigan Tax Tribunal (both Entire Tribunal and Residential Property and Small Claims Division) to defend property tax appeals.
    • Appear before the Township or City governing body when requested.
    • Conduct personal property canvasses.
    • Ensure the accuracy of land divisions and splits and combinations of parcels.
    • Respond to general inquiries for assessment records and inquiries for assessment records made under the Freedom of Information Act. Assessment records identified in MCL 211.10a must be made accessible and available for inspection and copying by the public. Assessment records are available for inspection and copying during normal office hours as posted above.
    • Provide reports to the Township or City governing body when requested.
    • Ensure that the mass appraisal methods and procedures employed are in compliance with requirements of the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) and the State Tax Commission’s Assessor’s Manual.
  • Pursuant to MCL 10e, the assessor or the assessor’s assistant(s) must use, maintain and calculate as necessary, the following assessment records:
    • Appraisal record card system
    • Personal property record system
    • Economic condition factor determinations
    • Land value determinations
    • Current year assessment roll
    • Photos of dwellings and outbuildings affixed to appraisal record cards and/or stored electronically using assessing software
    • Homeowner’s principal residence and qualified agricultural property exemption documents
    • Record of site visits to individual parcels
    • Historical assessment data
  • The assessor or the assessor’s assistant(s) must ensure that the assessment roll contains the following information: Click here to view the assessment roll.
    • Name and address of property owner
    • Legal description or approved parcel identification number
    • School district code
    • Property classification
    • Assessed valuation
    • Capped valuation
    • Taxable valuation
    • Board of Review valuation column
    • Michigan Tax Tribunal and/or State Tax Commission valuation column
    • Homeowner’s principal residence or qualified agricultural property
    • exemption percentage
    • Date of last transfer of ownership
    • Leasehold improvements identifier, if applicable
    • The value of Mathieu Gast non-considered improvements (under MCL 27), if applicable

Contact

Jason Woodcox

Forms

2766 Property Transfer Affidavit
2368 Principal Residence Exemption (PRE) Affidavit
2602 Request to Rescind Principal Residence Exemption (PRE)
4640 Conditional Rescission of Principal Residence Exemption (PRE)
Application for Land Division, under PA 591
Application for Land Division (exempt), under PA 591
Application for Lot Division, under Bagley Township Plat Ordinance

F.A.Q

Question: How are taxes calculated?
Answer: Taxes = Millage rate x Taxable Value

  • Taxable Value is in your Assessment Change Notice every February
  • Millage rate is voted on at the polls.

Question: Are taxes paid ahead or in arrears?
Answer: This question doesn’t actually apply to your taxes.

  • Your taxes are based on your property as it existed December 31st of the prior
    year.
  • The first tax bill arrives July 1st. Each taxing entity listed on that bill is collecting
    for that entire year (Jan 1 — Dec 31). The exception is the school operating
    millage. They collect half of the mills for that entire year.
  • The second bill arrives on December 1st. These are different taxing entities,
    collecting for that entire year (Jan 1 — Dec 31). The exception is the school
    operating millage. They collect the other half of the mills for that entire year.

Question: Why did my assessment go up so much in a single year? | thought it was limited.
Answer: Your assessment must be 50% of the True Cash Value of your property. The only limitation to the change is the market. You are taxed on the Taxable Value. This is limited to the rate of inflation or 5%, whichever is less, and it may not exceed the Assessed Value.

Question: We just bought our house. Doesn’t what we paid establish the value of our property?
Answer: Michigan law specifically says it does not.

  • (MCL 211.27(6) the purchase price paid in a transfer of property is not the presumptive true cash value of the
    property transferred. In determining the true cash value of transferred property, an assessing officer shall assess
    that property using the same valuation method used to value all other property of that same classification in the
    assessing jurisdiction.

Question: Can you take my late taxes after March 15t? How much are they with late penalties?
Answer: The assessor doesn’t collect taxes, that’s the treasurer’s job. The assessor doesn’t know what your taxes are. That said, here’s some information.

  • Your taxes are either “real property” taxes (ie: vacant land, buildings) or “personal property” taxes (commercial and industrial equipment or buildings on leased land). The township treasurer is responsible to collect personal property taxes even after the roll is turned over to the county in March, as delinquent.
  • If you received a bill from the county treasurer, the township can’t accept
    payment for it.

Question: How do I change the name on my tax bill?
Answer: We stick to what is on the deed, to the best of our ability. You could record a Quit Claim Deed from your former name to your current name.

Question: I need to join my lots into one description to get a building permit.
Answer: We can’t change platted lots. Only a circuit court judge can do that. We can (under certain conditions) put more than one parcel on a single tax bill. Submit a letter to the assessor asking that this be done. We’ll do what we can.

Question: Does the assessor have the right to just come on my property?
Answer: The assessor has no more right to come on your property than anyone else. The person who delivers your mail or packages, your neighbor who wants to bring you some fresh baked cookies, the census worker or the utilities meter reader, are all people who have the same right as the assessor. If you tell them to leave, they are trespassing if they don’t.

  • That being said, you should understand that the assessor must still place an assessment on your property for the purpose of taxation. The accuracy of that assessment is largely based on the accuracy of the data collected by the assessor.
  • Assessors just want to be correct in their work. It is to everyone’s advantage that they are and we use fewer erasers.

Purchasing a home that was exempt under the Disabled Veteran’s Exemption.
Your tax liability will be for the number of days you own it. We take what would have been the total tax levy for the year, divide it by 365, then multiply that by the number of days you own it. You will be responsible for part of both the summer and the winter taxes. The process is complicated and time consuming, because the State Tax Commission has to be involved. Contact the assessor.

  • If you have questions, feel free to contact the assessor. It’s usually easier than trying to fix something afterward. Please be patient with us. We may ask questions to ensure that the answer we give is the one you need.

Question: How are taxes calculated?
Answer: Taxes = Millage rate x Taxable Value

  • Taxable Value is in your Assessment Change Notice every February
  • Millage rate is voted on at the polls.

 

Question: Are taxes paid ahead or in arrears?
Answer: This question doesn’t actually apply to your taxes.

  • Your taxes are based on your property as it existed December 31t of the prior
    year.
  • The first tax bill arrives July 1%t. Each taxing entity listed on that bill is collecting
    for that entire year (Jan 1 — Dec 31). The exception is the school operating
    millage. They collect half of the mills for that entire year.
  • The second bill arrives on December 1. These are different taxing entities,
    collecting for that entire year (Jan 1 — Dec 31). The exception is the school
    operating millage. They collect the other half of the mills for that entire year.

 

Question: Why did my assessment go up so much in a single year? | thought it was limited.
Answer: Your assessment must be 50% of the True Cash Value of your property. The only limitation to the change is the market. You are taxed on the Taxable Value. This is limited to the rate of inflation or 5%, whichever is less, and it may not exceed the Assessed Value.

 

Question: We just bought our house. Doesn’t what we paid establish the value of our property?
Answer: Michigan law specifically says it does not.

  • (MCL 211.27(6) the purchase price paid in a transfer of property is not the presumptive true cash value of the
    property transferred. In determining the true cash value of transferred property, an assessing officer shall assess
    that property using the same valuation method used to value all other property of that same classification in the
    assessing jurisdiction.

 

Question: Can you take my late taxes after March 15t? How much are they with late penalties?
Answer: The assessor doesn’t collect taxes, that’s the treasurer’s job. The assessor doesn’t know what your taxes are. That said, here’s some information.

  • Your taxes are either “real property” taxes (ie: vacant land, buildings) or “personal property” taxes (commercial and industrial equipment or buildings on leased land). The township treasurer is responsible to collect personal property taxes even after the roll is turned over to the county in March, as delinquent.
  • If you received a bill from the county treasurer, the township can’t accept
    payment for it.

 

Question: How do | change the name on my tax bill?
Answer: We stick to what is on the deed, to the best of our ability. You could record a Quit Claim Deed from your former name to your current name.

 

Question: | need to join my lots into one description to get a building permit.
Answer: We can’t change platted lots. Only a circuit court judge can do that. We can (under certain conditions) put more than one parcel on a single tax bill. Submit a letter to the assessor asking that this be done. We’ll do what we can.

 

Question: Does the assessor have the right to just come on my property?
Answer: The assessor has no more right to come on your property than anyone else. The person who delivers your mail or packages, your neighbor who wants to bring you some fresh baked cookies, the census worker or the utilities meter reader, are all people who have the same right as the assessor. If you tell them to leave, they are trespassing if they don’t.

  • That being said, you should understand that the assessor must still place an assessment on your property for the purpose of taxation. The accuracy of that assessment is largely based on the accuracy of the data collected by the assessor.
  • Assessors just want to be correct in their work. It is to everyone’s advantage that they are and we use fewer erasers.

 

Purchasing a home that was exempt under the Disabled Veteran’s Exemption.
Your tax liability will be for the number of days you own it. We take what would have been the total tax levy for the year, divide it by 365, then multiply that by the number of days you own it. You will be responsible for part of both the summer and the winter taxes. The process is complicated and time consuming, because the State Tax Commission has to be involved. Contact the assessor.

  • If you have questions, feel free to contact the assessor. It’s usually easier than trying to fix something afterward. Please be patient with us. We may ask questions to ensure that the answer we give is the one you need.